Quiet Mind Plus Review

Quiet Mind Plus has been around for several years, but it has always been middle-of-the-road: not as popular as some other nootropic supplements, but not as widely denounced as some nootropics on the market. Over the years, there have been numerous claims about the potential Quiet Mind Plus scam, so we decided to find out whether this supplement really does what it says on the package. Here is our Quiet Mind Plus review.

What Is Quiet Mind Plus?

Quiet Mind Plus is a nootropic supplement that was created by Gregory Peters, a man who has been suffering from tinnitus for years before finding the cure that he later named Quiet Mind Plus. Tinnitus is a very uncomfortable condition with some real negative consequences, which is why patients with tinnitus are prepared to pay good money to alleviate those symptoms. Plus, Peters recommends not only using Quiet Mind Plus for tinnitus, but also taking it to achieve a better cognitive capacity, better focus, and reduce anxiety. But the big question here is whether Quiet Mind Plus pills can help you do all that.

Quiet Mind Plus Ingredients

One of the first problems we encountered on our quest to investigate the list Quiet Mind Plus ingredients is that the supplement does not appear to have an official website. The only information we could find regarding the ingredients was on third-party websites selling the product. And they never disclosed the official formula of Quiet Mind Plus either. All we could find was an approximate list of ingredients with no dosages or ratio of the things that are supposedly included in Quiet Mind Plus. Here are the ingredients you should expect to find in this supplement.

  • Vitamin B6

Vitamin B6 has never been considered a nootropic agent. It’s a substance that helps your metabolism get the most nutrients from the food you consume. Most people get enough vitamin B6 from regular food, but taking it in the form of a supplement can be helpful for increasing your energy levels.

  • Vitamin B12

Vitamin B12 is one of the few essential nutrients that are not produced by your body independently, meaning that you either need to consume plenty of it with food or opt for supplements containing vitamin B12. It can increase your energy levels, but it’s also not a nootropic.

  • Vitamin C

Vitamin C has a number of positive effects on the body and the immune system, being a powerful antioxidant. However, vitamin C cannot be classified as a nootropic and it surely won’t help with the tinnitus problem.

  • Garlic

Garlic is one of the most popular supplements around the world. It is thought to help lower bad cholesterol levels and blood pressure, improve your immune system, and flush out the toxins from the blood. However, Garlic is not commonly associated with a nootropic effect and has never been claimed to help treat tinnitus.

  • Olive leaves

As a health-conscious person, you are probably well familiar with the curing effect of olive oil. However, olive leaves don’t have the same efficiency as olive oil. They are capable of serving as an effective antioxidant and reducing inflammation, but they have ever been considered to be a part of the world of nootropics.

  • Hawthorn

The best-known use of hawthorn in traditional medicine is to help normalize blood pressure. It is also believed to be effective at reducing cholesterol and preventing congestive heart failure. What hawthorn cannot do, however, is help you with tinnitus or do other things Quiet Mind Plus promises to do.

  • Buchu leaves

The primary way to use buchu leaves is in cooking as it is mostly known for its sharp, fruity flavor. However, while there have been some claims of the ability of buchu leaves to help with certain health conditions like cystitis and other infections, there is no medical evidence to support those claims or the nootropic effect of buchu leaves.

  • Hibiscus

You have probably come across hibiscus as an ingredient of delicious and refreshing teas, and while some believe that hibiscus is rather effective against high cholesterol levels and blood pressure, it has never been tried and tested as a solution for tinnitus and other issues that Quiet Mind Plus claims to help combat.

  • Uva Ursi

Like buchu leaves, Uva Ursi has sometimes been used as a natural solution for various infections, including urinary tract infections. However, there is little to no information supporting the efficiency of Uva Ursi against decreasing cognitive performance and tinnitus.

  • Niacin

If the name Niacin sounds new to you, you definitely know its other name — vitamin B3. It has several ways to positively affect your health: it aids the digestive system, helps you enjoy clear and smooth skin, and, unlike most other Quiet Mind Plus ingredients, can improve your mental capabilities.

Our Thoughts On Quiet Mind Plus’s Formula

The manufacturers of Quiet Mind Plus make it nearly impossible to fairly judge the formula of the supplement by not disclosing the precise dosage of each active ingredient and the amount of secondary ingredients that go into every pill. There is simply no way for anyone to know how much of each ingredient you are getting in a single serving and whether it can have any positive effect on your body, let alone do the things it promises to do.

However, after closely investigating the existing information on the Quiet Mind Plus formula, we concluded that there are nearly no ingredients in this supplement that can affect your cognitive performance in any way. Some of these ingredients can be helpful for other parts of your body when taken in large doses, but they are unlikely to make a difference for your neural function.

Quiet Mind Plus Side Effects

When talking about the potential side effects of Quite Mind Plus, it’s important to remember that the company behind the supplement never officially disclosed the amount of each ingredient that goes into a single service. So while the ingredients in Quiet Mind Plus are not usually associated with severe side effects, you could easily contract the side effects due to a large dosage of an ingredient your body cannot tolerate.

The most common side effects reported by the Quiet Mind Plus consumers are fatigue, headaches, troubles with sleep, and upset stomach. Some consumers also admitted to experiencing a body odor due to Quiet Mind Plus containing generous amounts of garlic.

Does Quiet Mind Plus Work?

The Quiet Mind Plus supplement makes a number of bold claims, including the ability to enhance your memory, improve focus, alleviate anxiety, and, most importantly, help you get rid of tinnitus. But does Quiet Mind Plus have what it takes to give you the desired effect?

The truth is that the formula of Quiet Mind Plus pills does not contain any ingredients that are widely associated with a nootropic effect. While being good for your overall health, neither vitamin C, B6, B12, olive leaves, or garlic can make a significant difference in the way your brain operates.

It’s also worth noting that the most serious claim Quiet Mind Plus makes, by far, is the ability to cure tinnitus. Tinnitus is a serious medical condition that needs to be attended by a professional healthcare provider and you shouldn’t rely on a questionable nootropic supplement to help you with this issue. Besides, there is nothing in Quiet Mind Plus’s formula to support these claims.

Verdict

If you are wondering whether, despite the unclear formula and other issues with the ingredients, Quiet Mind Plus is a good nootropic supplement, we are ready to give our definitive answer. There is nothing about the list of ingredients in Quiet Mind Plus that can classify it as a nootropic, which means it can not rightfully compete with some of the most popular nootropics on the market.

There have not been any credible studies or publications regarding the positive nootropic effect of Quiet Mind Plus. Moreover, we cannot even call it a good supplement for your overall health: even though the ingredients contained in Quiet Mind Plus can, in theory, help with various health conditions, without knowing how much of each ingredient can be found in a single serving, means we are unable to evaluate its potential health benefits.

Frequently Asked Questions

Is Quiet Mind Plus a scam?

The supplement we are talking about today has several typical signs of scam activity: the absence of an official website, the lack of dosages for active ingredients, overall secrecy over the formula, and lots of positive reviews online that don’t seem real. But is Quiet Mind Plus a scam? The answer to this question mainly depends on your own definition of a scam; we would not call it an outright scam without seeing more evidence, but it certainly doesn’t seem overly trustworthy.

Is Quiet Mind Plus safe?

The ingredients that Quiet Mind Plus is supposed to contain are rarely associated with serious side effects: you can’t really get into too much trouble with garlic, vitamin C, or olive leaves. However, the biggest problem is that we don’t know for sure how much of each ingredient is included in every pill and what filler ingredients, if any, the manufacturer uses. That is why we cannot confirm with 100% confidence that Quiet Mind Plus is safe.

How to take Quiet Mind Plus?

The manufacturer recommends taking two Quiet Mind Plus pills every day. According to the company behind the supplement, the typical course is 60 days, or 2 months. However, the manufacturer also promises that you can see the first positive results after 3 weeks of regularly taking Quiet Mind Plus, but it’s best to take these claims with a grain of salt.

Where to buy Quiet Mind Plus?

Usually, the most reliable way to buy a nootropic supplement is from the official website of the company. However, that is not the case with Quiet Mind Plus. The official website of this supplement has not worked for a long time, so the best you can hope for right now is several third-party websites, although no one can vouch for their reliability and that you will get an original product.